USS Constitution freedom photo

Constitution, with sails, Boston

Constitution, with sails, Boston

Feb 20, 1815 – decisive battle between USS Constitution and two British ships: Cyane and Levant. Victory for Constitution, her last major battle during the War of 1812.

Copps Hill Burying Ground Freedom Trail photo

F-05310The tombstone of William Waters, d. 1691, at Copps Hill, in Boston’s North End. The North Battery was nearby, with cannons used in the Battle of Bunker Hill.

Old North Church interior photo

Old North © Steve Dunwell

Old North © Steve Dunwell

Christ Church in Boston, known as Old North, is getting an interior makeover. Preservationists are discovering the original colors, and finding painted cherubs around the ceiling.

Evacuation Day – Dorchester Heights

Washington at Dorchester Heights

Washington at Dorchester Heights

Evacuation Day and St. Patrick’s Day align in Boston, marking the departure of the British March 17, 1776. This ended the “Siege of Boston”. George Washington seized Dorchester Heights, fortified it with cannons, and surprised the British 2 weeks earlier. Painting by Gilbert Stuart.

“Bloody Massacre”, Boston, March 5, 1770

Boston Massacre, by Paul Revere, from MFAthe “Bloody Massacre” as depicted by Paul Revere. British troops fired on a crowd of citizens, wounding 8 and killing 5. March 5, 1770. Re-enactment 3/5/2016.

Boston Tea Party woodcut image

242 years ago this week. December 16, 1773 – A great crowd gathered at the Old South Meeting House to hear speeches protesting new taxes on imports, including tea. Shouting “Boston harbor a tea party tonight,” they went down to the nearby docks. Thinly disguised as “Mohawks”, fifty men boarded three East India ships – Dartmouth, Beaver and Eleanor. Breaking open 342 chests of imported tea, they dumped the lot into the harbor. The “Intolerable Acts” soon followed as punishment.242 years ago this week. December 16, 1773 – A great crowd gathered at the Old South Meeting House to hear speeches protesting new taxes on imports, including tea. Shouting “Boston harbor a tea party tonight,” they went down to the nearby docks. Thinly disguised as “Mohawks”, fifty men boarded three East India ships – Dartmouth, Beaver and Eleanor. Breaking open 342 chests of imported tea, they dumped the lot into the harbor. The “Intolerable Acts” soon followed as punishment.

Boston Common aerial photo Freedom Trail

Boston Common aerial view, Boston, MABoston Common, autumn, looking East. The Freedom Trail starts at the Visitors Center, near the corner of Park St. and Tremont St., (top left in this view)

USS Constitution to drydock photo

USS Constitution, Charlestown, Boston, MAUSS Constitution prepares to enter the drydock, at 12:30AM May 20. The booms are off, the cannons are off, much of the rigging has been removed, and the ship floats much higher than usual.

Paul Revere statue Boston photograph

Revere statue by Cyrus Dallin

Revere statue by Cyrus Dallin

Celebrating Paul Revere’s midnight ride on April 18th, 1775, this statue stands near Old North Church in Boston’s North End. The famous ride began with “two if by sea” and ended near Lexington, early on the 19th. Patriot’s Day, and the Boston Marathon, take place on the monday following.

Boston Massacre + Old State House photo

Old State House, snow © Steve Dunwell

Old State House, snow © Steve Dunwell

The Boston Massacre occurred on a snowy evening, March 5, 1770, in front of the Old State House. Troops occupying Boston to enforce the new British taxes fired into a mob of about sixty rowdy Bostonians, wounding eight and killing five. Crispus Attucks, an African-american, was among the first to die.